Tortas de Huevos (Egg Tortas)

December 20, 2015

A man’s social rank is determined by the amount of bread he eats in a sandwich.
~F. Scott Fitzgerald

This was much like our usual grist while camping in the gentle chaparral overlooking The Big Blue with infused fragrances of eucalyptus and rosemary. So, as with many other meals, it does bring back both fond yet conflicting memories.

Despite my indifference and sometimes general disdain about “religious holidays,” this dish would be so exquisite on that eve or next morning. One might as well eat, drink, and abound in this brief slice of life on earth, right?  So, keep this mock celebration of whatever or whomever (whose total lack of exactitude of birth in day or year astounds) a pagan or epicurean one.

Torta is a regional variety of flatbread which is a sandwich of sorts with divergent fillings that has existed from Spain to Portugal to Central America to Mesoamerica to Mexico to South America to the Caribbean and the Phillipines (most places Latin)

In essence, one makes scrambled eggs, then scoops them over bread with a slurry of cheese and other condiments already slathered on fine bread and finally topped with avocado (which happened to be indigenous to the region). Simple enough, yet really pleasing, especially with a fluent champagne that has a killer balance yet retains silky vibrancy.

Enough said?  Because this is holla good grub, a gastronome’s gem.

TORTAS DE HUEVOS (EGG TORTAS)

10 large, local eggs
A dollop of heavy whipping cream
White pepper
Dried thyme
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
A pinch of cayenne pepper
3-4 T unsalted butter

1 can chipotle chiles en adobo, drained
1 can black beans, drained

Tortas or Ciabatta rolls, cut almost into halves

1 1/2 C Chihuahua queso, grated

2 Haas avocados, peeled, pit discarded, thinly sliced

Chipotle salsa

Preheat oven to 350 F

Whisk the eggs with the cream, white pepper, thyme, sea salt and black pepper, cayenne until well combined.

Purée the chipotles en adobo sauce in a food processor until smooth and then afterwards the black beans until smooth.

Spread a thin layer of the chipotles en adobe over the bottom of each torta or ciabatta roll. Top with a layer of puréed black beans divided between the tortas or ciabatta rolls.

Melt the butter in a 12″ heavy non-stick skillet over low to medium heat because the eggs toughen rapidly. Pour in the egg mix and gently scrape the sides and bottom of the pan with a wooden spatula. Once the eggs have barely formed soft curds, and they are somewhat moist, remove the pan from the heat.

Divide the eggs between each torta or ciabatta roll. Sprinkle on the Chihuahua queso and cover with the top of the roll. Wrap in foil and place in the oven, baking for about 7-10 minutes until the cheese has melted and the torta or ciabatta has warmed. Unwrap each bun, remove the tops and place slices of avocado over the interiors of the sandwiches.

Serve with a side of chipotle salsa.

Bread + Eggs + Chipotles + Beans + Queso + Avocado.  Now, assemble with salsa nearby.

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I think it is a sad reflection on our civilization that while we can and do measure the temperature in the atmosphere of Venus we do not know what goes on inside our soufflés.
~Nicolas Kurti, physicist and chef

Kepler 425b, one of the closest, yet older, cousins to our own earth, has been found. (Perhaps the orb age is a celestial topic upon which both seculars and Christians can finally, somewhat agree.) A so called exoplanet which is some 60% larger than our world was discovered by the Keplar spacecraft, some 1,400 light years away in the habitable zone — where water could pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. It revolves around a bright star in about 385 days, and the temperatures are suitable for liquid although the jury is out whether the planet has a mountainous surface or is gassy like Neptune. Both Kepler 425b and its star (G-2 type) closely resemble the earth and our sun.

Many opine that this exoplanet will have a bulky atmosphere, rocky crust and restless volcanoes with more gravity than we experience. Does Kepler 452b sustain life?

Awe inspiring.

Admittedly, the under-served, lifted and puffy soufflé with its molten interior is almost sacred.

MUSHROOM SOUFFLE

2 T finely grated Parmigiano Reggiano
2 1/2 T unsalted butter

1/2 lb mushrooms (wild fungi such as cèpes, porcini, oyster or chanterelles or, if too expensive, buy cultivated such as crimini, shitake and button)
2 T unsalted butter

2 1/2 T unsalted butter
3 T all purpose flour
1 C whole milk
1 bay leaf

1/4 t pimentón
1/2 t sea salt
Nutmeg, a small grating
White pepper, a healthy pinch, preferably freshly ground
Cayenne pepper, a small pinch

4 large local egg yolks
5 large local egg whites
1 C gruyère cheese, grated

Gruyère cheese, grated, for topping

Preheat oven to 375 F

Melt 2 tablespoons unsalted butter in saucepan. Add the mushrooms and sauté for about 3 minutes. Transfer to a food processor and purée. Set aside.

Butter the surface of an 6 cup soufflé dish. Add the grated parmigiano-reggiano and roll around the dish to cover the sides and bottom, knocking out the excess.

Heat the milk with bay leaf in a heavy saucepan. Once hot, discard bay leaf and set aside the milk.

In another heavy saucepan, melt the butter, then blend in the flour with a wooden spoon to make a smooth loose paste. Stir over medium heat until the butter and flour come together without coloring more that a light yellow, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat.

Let stand a few seconds and then pour in all of the hot milk, whisking vigorously to blend. Return to medium heat, stirring with a wooden spoon; bring to a gentle boil for 3 minutes or until the sauce is quite thick. Whisk in the pimentón, salt, nutmeg and peppers and remove from heat again. Add the mushroom mash and mix well with the whisk.

While off the heat, add egg yolks one by one into the milk, herb and mushroom sauce, all the while whisking.

In a separate bowl, using a hand or stand up mixer wither fitted with a whisk, whip the egg whites until glossy and peaked. Stir in a quarter of the egg whites into the sauce with a wooden spoon or spatula. Once they are assumed in the sauce, fold in the remaining egg whites and the gruyère cheese. Turn the soufflé mixture into the prepared mold, which should be about three quarters full. Sprinkle a small amount grated gruyère on top.

Bake 25-30 minutes, until the top is golden brown, and the soufflé has puffed about 2″ over the rim of the mold. (Do not open oven door for 20 minutes.)

Basic Vinaigrette

February 3, 2009

Vinegar, the son of wine.
~Proverb

Like sandwiches, vinaigrettes always taste better if someone else makes them. So, have a friend or lover whisk up this simple version for you. For use on salads, cold roasted vegetables, even as a marinade for grilled chicken…you name it.

Some maintain that vinegar was discovered when wine was inadvertently left to sour. This resulting in the first batch of full bodied wine vinegar. The Talmud, a central text of mainstream Judaism, refers to a wicked son of a righteous father as a “vinegar son of wine.” The word vinegar is derived from the French word vinagere, which literally means sour wine.

Given the overt simplicity of the ingredients, good quality vinegars and olive oil are much preferred, even mandated.

BASIC VINAIGRETTE

2 T sherry vinegar
2 T red wine vinegar
2 T French Dijon mustard
Sea salt to taste

1-1 1/2 C extra virgin olive oil

Whisking gently, combine sherry and red wine vinegars, mustard and salt in a bowl. Whisking more vigorously, slowly add olive oil to create an emulsion. Taste for seasoning with a component of the food it will dress, such as a lettuce leaf or vegetable.

Pourboire: to vary, add or replace with any of the following: hazelnut oil, walnut oil, balsamic vinegar, champagne vinegar, citrus, smashed garlic, finely diced shallots, fresh chopped or whole herbs, whisked egg yolk, freshly ground pepper, white pepper, a dash of cayenne pepper…the possibilities are almost endless.

Store in a bottle or cruet in the refrigerator and shake or whisk at serving time.