Anyone who isn’t confused really doesn’t understand the situation.
~Edward R. Murrow

Clustered around the banks of the Sông Hương (Perfume) River, Huế is a quaint city in the Thừa Thiên–Huế province and the imperial capital of Vietnam held by Nguyễn feudal lords during the 18th to the mid 20th centuries. Well, until the French, then later the Japanese and then the French again and finally the Americans, interceded. No doubt, for typically myopic home politicians, this was way too much dominion for locals but bred sublime cuisine.

Huế, sometimes referred to as the City of Ghosts, is centrally located on the Indochina peninsula, a few miles inland from the South China Sea with verdant mountains nestled behind…and vast palaces, pagodas, colored tiles, rice paddies, tombs. A culture where ancestors never die. Huế was the royal capital until 1945, when then emperor Bảo Đại abdicated, and a government now convened in Hà Nội (Hanoi).

Huế was the site of perhaps the most ruthless battle of the Vietnam (or American) War. At the height of this costly and equivocal conflict, there were some 500,000 American troops in the country. Only a rather small percentage of the US public even knew where Vietnam was located.

In preparation, Vietcong troops launched a series of attacks on isolated garrisons in the highlands of central Vietnam and along the Laotian and Cambodian frontiers. Then, one early morning in late January, 1968, Vietcong forces emerged from their dark tunnels and holes to launch the Tet holiday offensive. In coordinated attacks throughout South Vietnam, they assaulted major urban areas and military bases in an attempt to foment rebellion against the Saigon regime and their American backers. Callous fighting ensued for several weeks, some of the most brutal at Hué — much of which was house to house with US Marines facing overwhelming odds, and the North Vietnamese suffering heavy casualties. Eventually, artillery and air support was brought to the forefront, and then nightmarish civilian massacres occurred. No burials, no altars.

But, as a result of the words and images from Saigon, the homeland press and public began to challenge the administration’s increasingly costly war. In the wake of the Tet offensive, the respected journalist Walter Cronkite, who had been a moderate observer of the war’s progress, noted that it seemed “more certain than ever that the bloody experience of Vietnam is to end in a stalemate.”

Oh, the sublime scents, flavors, sights, sounds of this evocative city. So many ambrosial even balmy and slurpy dishes in the Vietnamese repertoire originated in the Thừa Thiên–Huế region.

BUN BO HUE

2 lbs oxtail, cut into 2″-3″ pieces or pigs’ feet cut into chunks
2 lbs beef shanks, cut into 2″-3″pieces
2 lbs pork necks
2 lbs beef marrow bones, cut into 2″-3″ pieces
1 lb beef brisket

8 lemongrass stalks, leafy tops discarded and fleshy part retained
1 bunch scallions, white parts only, halved lengthwise
2 T paprika
1/2 C fish sauce

1 1/2 t red pepper flakes
1 t annatto seeds and/or saffron, ground

1/4 C+ canola oil
1 C shallots, peeled and sliced
1 t fresh garlic, peeled and minced
1/4 C lemon grass, minced
2 t shrimp paste
2 t sea salt
2 t local honey

1 package dried rice (bún) noodles

Thai basil sprigs, chopped
Cilantro leaves, chopped
Mint leaves, chopped
Green or red cabbage, thinly sliced
Lemon wedges
Lime wedges
Yellow onion, thinly sliced

Bring some water or broth to a rolling boil, and then add the oxtails, beef shank, and pork bones. Return the water to a boil and boil for 5 minutes. Drain the bones into a colander and rinse under cold running water. Rinse the pot and return the rinsed oxtails, neck bones, and shanks to the pot. Add the marrow bones and brisket.

Crush the lemongrass with the end of a heavy chef’s knofe and add it to the pot along with the scallions, paprika and fish sauce. Add 8 quarts fresh water and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat so the liquid is at a simmer and skim off any scum that rises to the surface.

After 45 minutes, ready an ice water bath, then check the brisket for doneness to ascertain whether the juices run clear. When the brisket is done, remove it from the pot (reserving the cooking liquid) and immediately submerge it in the ice water bath to cease the cooking process and give the meat a firmer texture. When the brisket is completely cool, remove from the water and pat dry. Also set aside the oxtails, beef shanks, pork shanks and beef marrow bones.

Continue to simmer the stock for another 2 hours, skimming as needed to remove any scum that forms on the surface. Remove from the heat and remove and discard the large solids. Strain through a fine mesh sieve into a large saucepan. Skim most of the fat from the surface of the stock. Return the stock to a simmer over medium heat.

In a spice grinder, grind the red pepper flakes and annatto seeds into a coarse powder. In a frying pan, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the ground red pepper flakes and annatto seeds and cook, stirring, for 10 seconds. Add the shallots, garlic, lemon grass, and shrimp paste and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes more, until the mixture is aromatic and the shallots are just beginning to soften.

Add the contents of the frying pan to the simmering stock along with the salt and honey and simmer for 20 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and more honey, if necessary.

Arrange the basil, cilantro, mint, cabbage, lemon and lime wedges, and onion slices on a platter and place on the table. Thinly slice the brisket against the grain. Divide the cooked noodles among warmed soup bowls, then divide the brisket slices evenly among the bowls, placing them on top of the noodles. Ladle the hot stock over the noodles and beef and serve promptly, accompanied with the platter of garnishes.

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Cooking is a language through which a society expresses itself.
~Jean Soler

With its varied traditions, diverse cultures, notable history and differing terrain, Vietnam is a cradle of supreme cuisine. One favorite at this table is Phở bò a luscious, soulful beef and rice noodle soup.

Phở originated in northern Vietnam in the early 20th Century, then spread to central and south Vietnam sometime after the defeat of the French in the climactic battle at Dien Bien Phu(1954)—marking the end of the French Indochina War and ultimately French colonization. The southward migration of phở throughout the country resulted in many regional variants of the dish, so that the phở in Hue differs from that in Ho Chi Minh City or Hanoi.

Phở, pronounced fuh (as in “what the phở?!) is traditionally served for breakfast in Vietnam, but can also be found as lunch or dinner fare. Understatedly nympholeptic.

Phở Nạm Bò

2 onions, peeled & quartered
6-8 slices fresh ginger, peeled & cut lengthwise into 1/2” slices
10 whole star anise
10 whole cardamom pods
2 cinnamon sticks

12 C chicken broth
4 C water
2 lb piece of beef brisket
1 lb beef neck and/or shank bones
6 oxtails

1-2 T fish sauce (nước mắm nhi)
2 T sugar
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

1 lb dried rice noodles, 1/4″ wide (banh pho)

6 green onions, sliced
6 sprigs large Thai or small Italian basil
2 jalapeño and assorted Thai chilies, stemmed, thinly cut on diagonal
1 lb cut of London broil
3 C fresh mung bean sprouts

Hoisin sauce
Hot chili sauce (e.g., Sriracha)
Lime wedges
Cilantro, stemmed and roughly cut
Mint, stemmed and roughly cut

Preheat oven to 350 F

Arrange onion quarters, rounded side down, and ginger pieces on baking sheet. Roast until onions begin to soften, about 20-25 minutes. Cut off dark, charred edges if any. Toast star anise, cardamom pods, and cinnamon sticks in small skillet over medium heat, until aromatic and slightly darker, about 3 minutes.

Bring broth, water and brisket to a boil in a large, heavy pot over high heat. Skim off foam that rises to top with a spider sieve. Add onions, ginger and toasted spices to the pot. Reduce heat to medium low. Cover and gently simmer until brisket is tender, about 2 1/2 hours. Again, skim off and discard any fat from the soup’s surface.  (Or you could increase the broth some and cook over low for about 8 hours.)

Transfer brisket, neck/shank bones and oxtails to cutting board; slice brisket thinly across the grain. Strain soup into large bowl, discarding the strained solids. Return soup, brisket, neck/shank bones and oxtails to same pot and boil 10 minutes. Add fish sauce (nước mắm nhi) and sugar, then season to taste with salt and pepper. Reduce heat to low simmer.

For the last 5 minutes or so of preparation have the London broil in the freezer to firm it for slicing. Then remove and slice crosswise into very thin strips with an extremely sharp knife.

Cook rice noodles in medium pot of boiling salted water until just tender, about 5 minutes. Drain.

Divide noodles among separate soup bowls. Add brisket (and necks/shanks, oxtails should you wish) to bowls. Then add the onions, beans and chilies to your liking. Top with London broil, and ladle hot soup over the top which will “cook” the steak. Serve with remaining garnishes on the table (hoisin, sriracha, basil, cilantro, mint, lime wedges).