Dry Rub A Dub

February 6, 2009

The food in such places is so tasteless because the members associate spices and garlic with just the sort of people they’re trying to keep out.
~Calvin Trillin

Today, spring-like weather bathed the city, evoking the seductive melody of vividly blossoming daffodils, azaleas, red buds, lilacs, forsythia…coupled with the aroma of active grills and barbeques.

A dry rub is simply a mélange of spices and herbs that imparts variegated flavors, scents and textures to meat, even the occasional vegetable. They are not to be confused with (but sometimes are married to) their moist but equally alluring cousins—marinades, glazes, sauces, wet rubs, bastes, sops, or mops. Only imagination limits the composition of your rubs, so put the grey matter to work and concote your own favorites.

With all of these rubs, first combine dry ingredients in a bowl or jar. Rub cut fresh, plump, cut garlic cloves into meat. Then gently massage the combined dry rub ingredients into the meat tissues. Let stand for an hour or more before cooking.

Ancho, Coffee and Cocoa Rub

2 T ancho chili powder
2 T instant espresso powder
2 T golden or dark brown sugar
1 T cocoa
1 T ground coriander
1 T dried oregano
2 t salt
1 T black pepper and/or white pepper
1/2 t cayenne pepper

Basic Barbeque Rub

2 T sea salt
4 T light brown sugar
1/4 t ground cinnamon
2 T ground cumin
2 T coriander
1 T ground cardamom
3 T pimentón or smoked paprika
2 t dry mustard
1 T ancho chili powder
1 T chipotle chili powder
3 T freshly ground pepper
1/2 T white pepper
3 t cayenne pepper

Tandoori Rub

6 T sweet paprika
2 T ground coriander
2 T ground cumin
1 T ground cardamom
1 T turmeric
2 T sea salt
1 T freshly ground black pepper
1 T sugar
1 T ground ginger
1 t ground cinnamon
1 t crumbled saffron threads (optional)
1 t cayenne pepper