WotY is “Science” (+ Gremolata x 5)

December 10, 2013

If the word doesn’t exist, invent it; but first be sure it doesn’t exist.
~ Charles Baudelaire

Just last week, Merriam-Webster, America’s leading dictionary publisher, announced its Word of the Year (WotY) based upon a surge in hits or lookups. Sciencethe systematic study of the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment garnered the award. “It is a word that is connected to broad cultural dichotomies: observation and intuition, evidence and tradition,” noted Peter Sokolowski, editor at large at Merriam-Webster. By the way, the word holding second place was “cognitive” which involves conscious mental activities such as thinking, understanding, learning, and remembering. Hmm

Oxford Dictionaries had earlier disagreed, bestowing the honor to the obsessive, egoistic term selfie, a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website. Could you possibly imagine sites as trite and fatuous as Facebook pages and Twitter feeds as fonts of narcissism? Right, sure. Although selfie is not in Oxford Dictionaries currently, it is being considered for future inclusion.

Gremolata (gremolada) from the Italian dialect word gremolaa (Lombardy) meaning “to break, mix, or knead” was traditionally made with a mortar and pestle. A versatile soul, gremolata is a condiment that can facilely grace braised, grilled, sautéed, and roasted meats, fowl and fish.

GREMOLATA

1/2 C flat leaf parsley leaves, washed and thoroughly dried, chopped
2 plump, fresh garlic cloves, peeled and minced
Zest of 1 lemon

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a small glass bowl, combine the parsley, garlic and lemon zest. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

GREMOLATA WITH ORANGE

1/2 C flat leaf parsley leaves, washed and thoroughly dried, chopped
2 plump, fresh garlic cloves, peeled and minced
Zest of 1/2 orange
Zest of 1/2 lemon

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a small glass bowl, combine the parsley, garlic and orange and lemon zests. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

MINT GREMOLATA

1/2 C fresh mint leaves, washed and thoroughly dried, chopped
Zest of 1 lemon
2 plump, fresh garlic cloves, peeled and minced
1/4 C pine nuts, toasted

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a small glass bowl, combine the mint, garlic, lemon zest and pine nuts. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

CILANTRO GREMOLATA

1/2 C cilantro leaves, washed and thoroughly dried, chopped
Zest of 1 lime
1/2 lime juice
2 plump, fresh garlic cloves, peeled and minced

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a small glass bowl, combine the cilantro, garlic, lime zest, and lime juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

GREMOLATA WITH BONE MARROW

Beef marrow scraped from 2 – 6″ long beef bones
1/2 C flat leaf parsley leaves, washed and thoroughly dried, chopped
2 plump, fresh garlic cloves, peeled and minced
Zest of 1 lemon

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a small glass bowl, whisk or mash together the marrow, parsley, garlic, and lemon zest. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Pourboire: For a more robust texture and a twist in flavor, consider adding finely chopped nuts such as hazelnuts or walnuts (or pine nuts as above) to any of the gremolatas.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: